Failure Information

Passenger and light duty vehicles built for use in the United States since 1996 include an On Board Diagnostics (OBD) system. The OBD systems monitors the vehicle’s major components, including those responsible for controlling emissions. While continuously checking for issues, the OBD system identifies emissions-related problems before they might be noticed otherwise.

When the OBD system determines that a problem exists, a corresponding “diagnostic trouble code” is stored in the computer memory. If the OBD system detects a problem that may cause the vehicle emissions to exceed federal emissions standards, the Malfunction Indicator Light (MIL) or “Check Engine” light, turns on. Federal law says this dashboard light can only be used to indicate an emissions problem.

What does a FAIL test result mean?

A vehicle that has one or more Diagnostic Trouble Codes (DTC) stored in the on board computer will fail an emission test. Vehicle manufacturers determine which DTCs they consider emissions-related. Federal law only allows a Check Engine light to be turned on for an emissions-related code. Therefore, if your Check Engine light is on, your vehicle will fail the inspection.

DTCs identify an emissions component or system that needs further diagnosis to determine the best course of action for repair. Diagnostic testing and repairs should be performed by a person or facility with proper training and tools. To find an Indiana State Certified Emissions Repair Facility, you can refer to the Vehicle Emission Repair Index (VERI) brochure.

Successful repairs will result in the computer automatically clearing the trouble code which will turn off the check engine light. If the mechanic clears the trouble codes by resetting the on board computer, the vehicle will then need to be driven for three to five days doing a combination of city and highway driving before coming back for a retest. If the vehicle is retested too soon after repairs, it may receive a REJECT test result.

Part of the inspection also ensures that the Check Engine light is working properly. A vehicle will fail the inspection if the Check Engine light is not operable.

Your vehicle may have failed because it exceeds the limit for one or more allowable emissions.

  • High Level of Hydrocarbons (HC): Excessive Hydrocarbons result from unburned fuel or excessive evaporative emissions.
  • High Level of Carbon Monoxide (CO): Usually the results of a rich fuel mixture, there is either too much fuel or too little air reaching the combustion chamber.
  • High Level of Oxides of Nitrogen (NOx): In internal combustion engines, NOx is a produced when temperatures reach a high enough level to burn some of the nitrogen in the air.

A vehicle can also fail if it was originally manufactured with a certain emissions control equipment like a catalytic converter, but that equipment has been removed, disconnected or damaged. This is considered a test failure due to tampering. If your vehicle fails due to a tampering issue, the missing or disconnected emission controls need to be replaced and the vehicle can be retested.

All vehicles require an appropriate and properly sealed gas cap. If the gas cap does not seal properly and allows fuel vapor to leak from the fuel tank, the vehicle will fail this portion of the test. Clean Air Car Check provides replacement gas caps for most model vehicles. If we can replace a failing gas cap for you, we will. In some cases, though, you may need to purchase a new, properly fitting gas cap and return for a retest.

What Next? Repair and Retest

The Indiana Vehicle Inspection Report (VIR) details the cause of your vehicle’s emissions failure. Carefully review this document and make repairs to address the area of failure. You may want to choose an Indiana State Certified Emissions Repair Facility from the Vehicle Emission Repair Index (VERI) brochure.

Before you return to Clean Air Car Check for a retest, the person who made the repairs on your vehicle must complete and sign the back of your Vehicle Inspection Report (VIR). Repair facilities must include their federal tax ID number. If this form is not completely filled out, your vehicle may not be tested.

Need more time to make repairs?

BMV Service Provider logoIf the vehicle does not pass and you need additional time to make repairs, eligible motorists can purchase a temporary permit onsite with Clean Air Car Check’s “Drive-thru. Renew!” once a vehicle passes the inspection, or receives a waiver, “Drive-thru. Renew!” can also renew your vehicle’s registration. The registered owner of the vehicle must be present to purchase the temporary permit.

Additional fees apply. Accepted payment methods are cash, check, Visa and MasterCard. Call 1-888-240-1684 for more information about additional BMV services available at Clean Air Car Check.

DOWNLOAD BROCHURES

  1. CACC Program Brochure – DOWNLOAD
  2. Failure Information Brochure – DOWNLOAD
  3. Understanding Onboard Diagnostics Brochure – DOWNLOAD
  4. Vehicle Emission Repair Index – DOWNLOAD

Passenger and light duty vehicles built for use in the United States since 1996 include an On Board Diagnostics (OBD) system. The OBD systems monitors the vehicle’s major components, including those responsible for controlling emissions. While continuously checking for issues, the OBD system identifies emissions-related problems before they might be noticed otherwise.

When the OBD system determines that a problem exists, a corresponding “diagnostic trouble code” is stored in the computer memory. If the OBD system detects a problem that may cause the vehicle emissions to exceed federal emissions standards, the Malfunction Indicator Light (MIL) or “Check Engine” light, turns on. Federal law says this dashboard light can only be used to indicate an emissions problem.

What does a REJECT test result mean?

Vehicles that are model year 1996 and newer have readiness monitor software in the onboard computer. A monitor performs a “self-check” that the emissions system is working correctly. Monitors look for speeds, temperatures, fluid levels and pressures. When the monitor receives proper information its status will be reported as “Complete.” If the monitor is not receiving the proper information, its status will be reported as “Incomplete.” Only the EVAP monitor is allowed to be Incomplete, because it sometimes needs to see specific weather conditions that are out of the driver’s control.

Common causes of incomplete monitors:

  • The on board computer isn’t receiving proper information
  • Low battery voltage which causes the computer to lose memory
  • A scan tool was used to clear information stored in the computer
  • A failing component that has not turned on the Check Engine light yet
  • A “pending” Diagnostic Trouble Code (DTC)

What to do if your test result is REJECT

We recommend driving the vehicle over the course of three to five days, doing a combination of city and highway driving during that time. Once this has been completed, return to Clean Air Car Check for a retest. If the vehicle gets another Reject result, it may need further diagnosis from a qualified repair facility.

A list of Indiana Certified Emission Repair Facilities can be found in the Vehicle Emission Repair Index (VERI) brochure.

A model year 1976-1995 vehicle may be rejected from testing if the vehicle has certain conditions that may make it unsafe to proceed with testing or threaten the integrity of the test results.

Make sure your brakes are in good condition. Poor brakes are not only a safety hazard, but also make the vehicle very difficult to test on the equipment and may cause the vehicle to be rejected from testing. If your vehicle is rear wheel drive, you must have functioning rear brakes.

Make sure your front wheel drive vehicle is properly aligned. Poor front end alignment will make the vehicle difficult to test and may cause the vehicle to be rejected.

Make sure your exhaust is intact and leak free. Because we are collecting and analyzing your vehicle’s tailpipe emissions, we must be able to collect an undiluted sample from the tailpipe. If your exhaust system has leaks we will not be able to perform the test.

Repair any significant fluid leaks prior to testing. If your vehicle is leaking a significant amount of fluid, we will not be able to perform a test.

If your 1976-1995 model year vehicle is rejected from testing, you will receive a Customer Notice that details the reason the vehicle cannot be tested. You will need to correct these issues before returning for a retest.

What Next? Repair and Retest

The Indiana Vehicle Inspection Report (VIR) details the cause of your vehicle’s emissions failure. Carefully review this document and make repairs to address the area of failure. You may want to choose an Indiana State Certified Emissions Repair Facility from the Vehicle Emission Repair Index (VERI) brochure.

Before you return to Clean Air Car Check for a retest, the person who made the repairs on your vehicle must complete and sign the back of your Vehicle Inspection Report (VIR). Repair facilities must include their federal tax ID number. If this form is not completely filled out, your vehicle may not be tested.

BMV Service Provider logoNeed more time to make repairs?

If the vehicle does not pass and you need additional time to make repairs, eligible motorists can purchase a temporary permit onsite with Clean Air Car Check’s “Drive-thru. Renew!” once a vehicle passes the inspection, or receives a waiver, “Drive-thru. Renew!” can also renew your vehicle’s registration. The registered owner of the vehicle must be present to purchase the temporary permit.

Additional fees apply. Accepted payment methods are cash, check, Visa and MasterCard. Call 1-888-240-1684 for more information about additional BMV services available at Clean Air Car Check.

Failure Information

Passenger and light duty vehicles built for use in the United States since 1996 include an On Board Diagnostics (OBD) system. The OBD systems monitors the vehicle’s major components, including those responsible for controlling emissions. While continuously checking for issues, the OBD system identifies emissions-related problems before they might be noticed otherwise.

When the OBD system determines that a problem exists, a corresponding “diagnostic trouble code” is stored in the computer memory. If the OBD system detects a problem that may cause the vehicle emissions to exceed federal emissions standards, the Malfunction Indicator Light (MIL) or “Check Engine” light, turns on. Federal law says this dashboard light can only be used to indicate an emissions problem.

What does a FAIL test result mean?

A vehicle that has one or more Diagnostic Trouble Codes (DTC) stored in the on board computer will fail an emission test. Vehicle manufacturers determine which DTCs they consider emissions-related. Federal law only allows a Check Engine light to be turned on for an emissions-related code. Therefore, if your Check Engine light is on, your vehicle will fail the inspection.

DTCs identify an emissions component or system that needs further diagnosis to determine the best course of action for repair. Diagnostic testing and repairs should be performed by a person or facility with proper training and tools. To find an Indiana State Certified Emissions Repair Facility, you can refer to the Vehicle Emission Repair Index (VERI) brochure.

Successful repairs will result in the computer automatically clearing the trouble code which will turn off the check engine light. If the mechanic clears the trouble codes by resetting the on board computer, the vehicle will then need to be driven for three to five days doing a combination of city and highway driving before coming back for a retest. If the vehicle is retested too soon after repairs, it may receive a REJECT test result.

Part of the inspection also ensures that the Check Engine light is working properly. A vehicle will fail the inspection if the Check Engine light is not operable.

Your vehicle may have failed because it exceeds the limit for one or more allowable emissions.

  • High Level of Hydrocarbons (HC): Excessive Hydrocarbons result from unburned fuel or excessive evaporative emissions.
  • High Level of Carbon Monoxide (CO): Usually the results of a rich fuel mixture, there is either too much fuel or too little air reaching the combustion chamber.
  • High Level of Oxides of Nitrogen (NOx): In internal combustion engines, NOx is a produced when temperatures reach a high enough level to burn some of the nitrogen in the air.

A vehicle can also fail if it was originally manufactured with a certain emissions control equipment like a catalytic converter, but that equipment has been removed, disconnected or damaged. This is considered a test failure due to tampering. If your vehicle fails due to a tampering issue, the missing or disconnected emission controls need to be replaced and the vehicle can be retested.

All vehicles require an appropriate and properly sealed gas cap. If the gas cap does not seal properly and allows fuel vapor to leak from the fuel tank, the vehicle will fail this portion of the test. Clean Air Car Check provides replacement gas caps for most model vehicles. If we can replace a failing gas cap for you, we will. In some cases, though, you may need to purchase a new, properly fitting gas cap and return for a retest.

What Next? Repair and Retest

The Indiana Vehicle Inspection Report (VIR) details the cause of your vehicle’s emissions failure. Carefully review this document and make repairs to address the area of failure. You may want to choose an Indiana State Certified Emissions Repair Facility from the Vehicle Emission Repair Index (VERI) brochure.

Before you return to Clean Air Car Check for a retest, the person who made the repairs on your vehicle must complete and sign the back of your Vehicle Inspection Report (VIR). Repair facilities must include their federal tax ID number. If this form is not completely filled out, your vehicle may not be tested.

Need more time to make repairs?

Indiana BMV Service Provider logoIf the vehicle does not pass and you need additional time to make repairs, eligible motorists can purchase a temporary permit onsite with Clean Air Car Check’s “Drive-thru. Renew!” once a vehicle passes the inspection, or receives a waiver, “Drive-thru. Renew!” can also renew your vehicle’s registration. The registered owner of the vehicle must be present to purchase the temporary permit.

Additional fees apply. Accepted payment methods are cash, check, Visa and MasterCard. Call 1-888-240-1684 for more information about additional BMV services available at Clean Air Car Check.

DOWNLOAD BROCHURES

  1. CACC Program Brochure – DOWNLOAD
  2. Failure Information Brochure – DOWNLOAD
  3. Understanding Onboard Diagnostics Brochure – DOWNLOAD
  4. Vehicle Emission Repair Index – DOWNLOAD

Passenger and light duty vehicles built for use in the United States since 1996 include an On Board Diagnostics (OBD) system. The OBD systems monitors the vehicle’s major components, including those responsible for controlling emissions. While continuously checking for issues, the OBD system identifies emissions-related problems before they might be noticed otherwise.

When the OBD system determines that a problem exists, a corresponding “diagnostic trouble code” is stored in the computer memory. If the OBD system detects a problem that may cause the vehicle emissions to exceed federal emissions standards, the Malfunction Indicator Light (MIL) or “Check Engine” light, turns on. Federal law says this dashboard light can only be used to indicate an emissions problem.

What does a REJECT test result mean?

Vehicles that are model year 1996 and newer have readiness monitor software in the onboard computer. A monitor performs a “self-check” that the emissions system is working correctly. Monitors look for speeds, temperatures, fluid levels and pressures. When the monitor receives proper information its status will be reported as “Complete.” If the monitor is not receiving the proper information, its status will be reported as “Incomplete.” Only the EVAP monitor is allowed to be Incomplete, because it sometimes needs to see specific weather conditions that are out of the driver’s control.

Common causes of incomplete monitors:

  • The on board computer isn’t receiving proper information
  • Low battery voltage which causes the computer to lose memory
  • A scan tool was used to clear information stored in the computer
  • A failing component that has not turned on the Check Engine light yet
  • A “pending” Diagnostic Trouble Code (DTC)

What to do if your test result is REJECT

We recommend driving the vehicle over the course of three to five days, doing a combination of city and highway driving during that time. Once this has been completed, return to Clean Air Car Check for a retest. If the vehicle gets another Reject result, it may need further diagnosis from a qualified repair facility.

A list of Indiana Certified Emission Repair Facilities can be found in the Vehicle Emission Repair Index (VERI) brochure.

A model year 1976-1995 vehicle may be rejected from testing if the vehicle has certain conditions that may make it unsafe to proceed with testing or threaten the integrity of the test results.

Make sure your brakes are in good condition. Poor brakes are not only a safety hazard, but also make the vehicle very difficult to test on the equipment and may cause the vehicle to be rejected from testing. If your vehicle is rear wheel drive, you must have functioning rear brakes.

Make sure your front wheel drive vehicle is properly aligned. Poor front end alignment will make the vehicle difficult to test and may cause the vehicle to be rejected.

Make sure your exhaust is intact and leak free. Because we are collecting and analyzing your vehicle’s tailpipe emissions, we must be able to collect an undiluted sample from the tailpipe. If your exhaust system has leaks we will not be able to perform the test.

Repair any significant fluid leaks prior to testing. If your vehicle is leaking a significant amount of fluid, we will not be able to perform a test.

If your 1976-1995 model year vehicle is rejected from testing, you will receive a Customer Notice that details the reason the vehicle cannot be tested. You will need to correct these issues before returning for a retest.

What Next? Repair and Retest

The Indiana Vehicle Inspection Report (VIR) details the cause of your vehicle’s emissions failure. Carefully review this document and make repairs to address the area of failure. You may want to choose an Indiana State Certified Emissions Repair Facility from the Vehicle Emission Repair Index (VERI) brochure.

Before you return to Clean Air Car Check for a retest, the person who made the repairs on your vehicle must complete and sign the back of your Vehicle Inspection Report (VIR). Repair facilities must include their federal tax ID number. If this form is not completely filled out, your vehicle may not be tested.

Need more time to make repairs?

Indiana BMV Service Provider logoIf the vehicle does not pass and you need additional time to make repairs, eligible motorists can purchase a temporary permit onsite with Clean Air Car Check’s “Drive-thru. Renew!” once a vehicle passes the inspection, or receives a waiver, “Drive-thru. Renew!” can also renew your vehicle’s registration. The registered owner of the vehicle must be present to purchase the temporary permit.

Additional fees apply. Accepted payment methods are cash, check, Visa and MasterCard. Call 1-888-240-1684 for more information about additional BMV services available at Clean Air Car Check.

Facility Locations & Hours

LOCATIONS
  • Crown Point – 755 N. Industrial Blvd. [map]
  • Gary – 3901 W. Fourth Ave. [map]
  • Griffith – 232 Ivanhoe Court South [map]
  • Hammond – 1231 Gostlin St. [map]
  • Hobart – 325 Sullivan St. [map]
  • Portage – 5777 Melton Rd. [map]
  • Valparaiso – 2503 Beech St. [map]

Call us at 888-240-1684 or 219-661-8269

HOURS

Tuesday – 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday – 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday – 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday – 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday – 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. CLOSED – Sunday, Monday and State Holidays

View STATE Holiday LISTING

AVOID THE RUSH!

Vehicles can be inspected beginning in October of the year before they are due to be tested. There is no need to wait for a notice to arrive in the mail, just bring in your vehicle prior to its registration expiration. Read More…

VEHICLES DUE FOR TESTING IN 2020

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